Health careHome Health Care Tips

4 Tips for Keeping up With Your Breast Health

Staying “healthy,” often requires lifestyle changes, dedication and knowing your body. For women, maintaining your breast health will reduce your risk of breast cancer and help to improve your overall health. Cynthia Plate, MD, breast specialist with Adventist Health Care, has four tips to help your breast health.

Eat well and exercise. “What you eat can have a surprising impact on your overall breast health,” says Dr. Plate. “Sticking to natural foods—foods with natural ingredients that are not overly processed—is a great place to start.” On top of eating well, staying active and adding exercise to your daily regimen is extremely important for both your breast health and your overall health. “Try and get 30 minutes of vigorous exercise in every day, or, an hour of moderate activity,” says Dr. Plate.

Conduct self-examinations. “Self-exams can be a critical first step in detecting any abnormalities within the breasts,” says. Dr. Plate. “Women should perform a self-exam at least once a month to keep track of any changes.” According to the National Breast Cancer Foundation, self-exams can be conducted in the shower, in front of a mirror, or lying down. Using your fingertips, check for bumps, lumps, skin dimpling (texture of an orange peel), discharge, and any other abnormality.

Watch for lumps. It’s important to know and understand what you’re feeling during a self-exam. Normal parts of your anatomy, like milk lobes and lymph nodes, feel like soft peas or beans. Lumps, however, often feel hard, like a lemon seed.

Get your mammogram. “Mammograms are the most accurate form of diagnostic testing available when it comes to detecting breast cancer,” says. Dr. Plate. “All women, no matter your risk, should begin getting yearly mammograms at age 40. Women with certain risk factors should talk with their doctor to discuss earlier or other screening options.”
You may be at a higher risk for breast cancer if you have any of the following:

BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutations
A personal diagnosis of breast cancer before age 50
One or more first-degree relatives with premenopausal breast cancer
History of chest radiation before age 30
History of an abnormal breast biopsy
Ashkenazi Jewish or African descent
Extremely dense breasts, diagnosed through a mammogram screening
For more information, take Adventist Healthcare easy and fast breast cancer risk assessment at healthcaretipstoday.com

Resource Blog: https://tinyurl.com/yyhxlose

Author: deepa

Deepa is a writer and a passionate blogger. She has years of experience in writing articles, blogs and press releases after a deep research. At http://healthcaretipstoday.com she writes interesting topics on all health, beauty, fitness and healthy life. She loves exploring, researching and providing the best information to readers. In her free times, she loves to read books.

How useful was this post?

Click on a star to rate it!

Average rating / 5. Vote count:

Show More

deepa

Deepa is a writer and a passionate blogger. She has years of experience in writing articles, blogs and press releases after a deep research. At http://healthcaretipstoday.com she writes interesting topics on all health, beauty, fitness and healthy life. She loves exploring, researching and providing the best information to readers. In her free times, she loves to read books.

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Translate »
Close

Adblock Detected

Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker